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Merchant Marine Ships

U.S. Merchant MarineThe United States Merchant Marine transports goods and services in wartime as an auxiliary to the U.S. Navy.  During military conflicts, the Merchant Marine operates civilian-owned merchant ships as well as vessels maintained through government entities like the Military Sea Transportation Service or Military Sealift Command.  U.S. Merchant Marine vessels, like Navy vessels, were filled with asbestos insulation, putting the men aboard at risk for mesothelioma.

In World War II, sea transportation was run by several different government agencies.  After the War, in 1949, the Department of Defense consolidated authority for its ocean transport requirements under a single agency, the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS).  In 1970, MSTS was transformed into Military Sealift Command (MSC).

Learn more about the MERCHANT MARINE in the Vietnam War

The Merchant Marine played an integral role in our nation’s victory in WWII. During the War, the U.S. lost 733 American cargo ships.  One in twenty-four Merchant Mariners died during their dangerous service, which represents the highest casualty rate for any branch of the military service.  Merchant shipping was also important during the wars in Korea and Vietnam.  In 1988, Merchant Mariners who served in WWII were granted veteran status with the ability to receive veteran’s benefits.  But the U.S. Merchant Marines who served in the Vietnam War – bringing transport, fuel, ammunition, medical supplies, food and mail to the troops – still have not been granted such status.  Those killed by rockets, snipers, mines and explosions and those still Missing in Action and presumed dead are not recognized as veterans; nor are their names carved on The Wall in Washington D.C.

U.S. Merchant Marine in the Korean War

When North Korea invaded South Korea on June 25, 1950, the U.S. Merchant Marines were among the first to serve.  They continued to serve during the entire conflict, more than three years.  Throughout the war, the Merchant Marine participated in the effort to move men, transport, equipment, fuel, supplies, food and more across 5,000 miles of Pacific Ocean from the United States to Korea.

In September 1950, the United Nations conducted an amphibious invasion at Inchon that seemed poised to end the conflict until China and the Soviet Union intervened on behalf of their Communist neighbor.  The Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) managed the cargo ships participating in the operation, including 13 USNS cargo ships and 26 chartered commercial American merchant ships.

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When Hungnam had to be evacuated in December 1950, merchant ships were there.  In less than two weeks, the Navy and Merchant Marine brought out more than 100,000 U.N. troops together with 91,000 Korean refugees.  They also moved 17,500 vehicles and 350,000 tons of cargo in the same short time.  Just hours before the Communists pushed the U.N. forces out of North Korea, the U.S. merchant ship SS Meredith Victory, designed to carry twelve passengers, evacuated over 14,000 Korean civilians to Pusan in the south. The Maritime Administration honored the Meredith Victory crew with a Gallant Ship Award for the heroic rescue.

In March of 1951, the U.S. Secretary of Commerce formed the National Shipping Authority (NSA) to make ships available from the Maritime Administration’s National Defense Fleet (NDRF). These cargo and supply vessels would be used when the needs of the military and other government agencies exceeded the capabilities of the privately-owned merchant vessels of the U.S. Merchant Marine.  In addition, during wartime, the NSA was given authority to requisition commercial merchant ships to be used for military purposes.

As soon as the NSA was created, it reactivated over 600 NDRF ships to help America’s European allies move coal needed to rebuild their defenses.  NSA also reactivated around 700 NDRF ships for services in the Far East.  At the peak of the Korean War, 255 merchant vessels were active in the effort.  MSTS reported that commercial vessels supplied 85 percent of the dry cargo requirements throughout the Korean War.

For three years, commercial and MSTS cargo ships unloaded supplies in the port of Pusan around the clock.  Over 90 percent of all American and other U.N. troops arrived in Korea on MSTS ships.  The effectiveness of the U.S. Navy warships off the Korean coast depended upon underway replenishment, made possible by the U.S. Merchant Marine. Admiral C.T. Joy, then the commander of U.S. Naval Forces in the Far East, once congratulated Navy Captain A.F. Junker, who was then Western Pacific Commander of the Military Sea Transportation Service, for the successful contributions of MSTS to the Korean War effort: “The Merchant Mariners in your command performed silently, but their accomplishments speak loudly. Such teammates are comforting to work with.”

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Merchant Marine vessels serving bravely during the Korean War included:

Merchant Marine vessels, asbestos & the Korean War

SS Lane Victory engine room with asbestos-covered equipment At least until the 1970s, MSTS vessels, Victory ships and privately-owned merchant vessels were heavily contaminated with asbestos.  Anytime the vessels relied on steam propulsion, the steam pipes were all covered with asbestos insulation.  Many of the vessels were outfitted with asbestos fireproofing to minimize the risk of fire.  Men aboard ship commonly used asbestos gloves when they worked with or around high-heat equipment in the engine, boiler and fire rooms.  They also wore asbestos gloves to handle the large spent shell casings on deck when the guns were fired.  The many pumps, valves and flanges all over the ship required the use of asbestos packing and gaskets.

As the asbestos insulation on these merchant vessels was inevitably damaged, dislodged or replaced, the asbestos fibers contained in the insulation would go spiraling into the surrounding air space.  If you were working on the insulation, or even if you were just working close-by, the odds are good that you were exposed to asbestos.  After all, quarters were tight on the vessels and there was nowhere for the asbestos to go.

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When you inhale asbestos fibers into your body, they act like tiny needles.  Asbestos fibers can stick in your lungs or other tissue and stay there – for decades.  Over time, those embedded asbestos fibers can cause mesothelioma, a fatal cancer caused only by asbestos exposure.  Unfortunately, the symptoms of mesothelioma usually don’t show up until decades have passed since your first exposure to asbestos.  The exposure to asbestos you had as long ago as the Korean War could be the cause of your mesothelioma today.

U.S. Victory Ships

U.S. Merchant Marine Vessels Filled with AsbestosWhen the United States entered into World War II in December of 1941, cargo ships were being sunk by German submarines nearly as fast as they could be built.  In response, the United States began a ship-building campaign that produced 5,500 vessels, including cargo and passenger ships for the nation’s merchant fleet. Early in the War, 2,710 Liberty Ships were mass-produced for the merchant fleet. Not exactly sleek in design, the ships were nicknamed “the ugly ducklings.”  The ships were modeled after an old British freighter design and had a limited speed of around 9 knots.  Because the Liberty ships were slow, they were forced to travel in convoys and could not outrun 11-knot German submarines.  Still, enough of the vessels were constructed that the U.S. was finally able to keep up with the losses suffered as a result of the U-Boat attacks.

Thank you for your service to our countryServiceable though they were, however, the Liberty ships were not large enough or fast enough to transport the tons of supplies needed by the U.S. and the Allied Forces.  Further, a weakness in the design of the hull sometimes caused the ships to break in two.  So in 1942, the United States War Shipping Administration commissioned the design for an enhanced cargo ship.  The following year, the nation embarked on another new merchant ship-building venture – this time to construct hundreds more cargo ships that were quicker and bigger than the Liberty ships, with a longer range.  The new ships were known as the Victory ships.

The Victory ships were built in six shipyards across the country; 534 were completed.  The cargo ships displaced 15,200 tons and were 455-feet-long with a speed of 15 to 17 knots.  The faster speed was achieved by giving the Victory ships a “cruiser” stern and improved engines.  Victory ships relied on reciprocating steam engines, steam turbines or Diesel engines and electrically-powered auxiliary equipment.  The main propulsion marine steam turbine unit was located midship.  Steam was provided by Babcock & Wilcox boilers with refractory in the walls and floors.

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Like the earlier Liberty ships, the Victory ships came with five cargo holds each – three forward and two aft.  Victory ships generally were manned by U.S. Merchant Marine civilian sailors, with U.S. Navy Armed Guard operating the armament.  The civilian crew usually included 62 merchant mariners.  There were generally 28 U.S. Navy personnel who operated the communications equipment and defensive guns.  The crew quarters were found amidships.

The first Victory ship was completed in February, 1944.  When the War ended, 531 had been constructed. Of these, 414 were standard cargo vessels and 117 were attack transport ships.  After the War in 1946, three more Victory ships were finished for the Alcoa Steamship Company.  The 534 U.S. Victory ships produced included the following types:

  • 272 general cargo vessels (VC2-S-AP2) (6,000 hp)
  • 141 general cargo vessels (VC2-S-AP3) (8,500 hp)
  • 1 Diesel vessel (VC2-M-AP4)
  • 117 Haskell-class attack transports (VC2-S-AP5)
  • 3 Alcoa Steamship vessels (VC2-S-AP7)

At the conclusion of WWII, many of the Victory ships went into mothball storage with the Maritime Administration’s National Defense Fleet (NDRF).  The NDRF stores mainly merchant vessels that can be reactivated in just weeks to satisfy the nation’s shipping needs in national emergencies, either military (as in wartime) or non-military (as in commercial shipping crises).  The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration manages NDRF.  NDRF is entirely separate from the U.S. Navy reserve fleets, which are made up mostly of warships rather than supply or cargo ships.  In 1950 at the start of the Korean War, the NDRF was maintaining 2,277 vessels – its largest inventory ever.

Victory Ships Serving in the Korean War

Many of the Victory ships built during the Second World War were called out of storage by the NSA, reactivated, refurbished and sent into action with Merchant Marine crews during the Korean War.  These NDRF Victory ships include the following:

  • SS Lane Victory - Merchant Marine ship laden with asbestosSS Adelphia Victory
  • SS Adrian Victory
  • SS Aiken Victory
  • SS Alamo Victory
  • SS Albion Victory
  • SS Alfred Victory
  • SS Allegheny Victory
  • SS Alma Victory
  • SS Amarillo Victory
  • SS American Victory
  • SS Anniston Victory
  • SS Arcadia Victory
  • SS Asbury Victory
  • SS Barnard Victory
  • SS Bartlesville Victory
  • SS Baton Rouge Victory
  • SS Baylor Victory
  • SS Beatrice Victory
  • SS Beaver Victory
  • SS Bedford Victory
  • SS Belgium Victory
  • SS Beloit Victory
  • SS Berea Victory
  • SS Bessemer Victory
  • SS Binghampton Victory
  • SS Bloomington Victory
  • SS Blue Field Victory
  • SS Blue Island Victory
  • SS Boulder Victory
  • SS Bowdoin Victory
  • SS Brainerd Victory
  • SS Brazil Victory
  • SS Brigham Victory
  • SS Britain Victory
  • SS Bucknell Victory
  • SS Bucyrus Victory
  • SS Burbank Victory
  • SS C.C.N.Y. Victory
  • SS Canton Victory
  • SS Carlton Victory
  • SS Carroll Victory
  • SS Catawba Victory
  • SS Central Victory
  • SS China Victory
  • SS Clarksburg Victory
  • SS Clarksville Victory
  • SS Clearwater Victory
  • SS Clovis Victory
  • SS Coe Victory
  • SS Coeur d’Alene Victory
  • SS Cooper Union Victory
  • SS Cornell Victory
  • SS Council Bluffs Victory
  • SS Creighton Victory
  • SS Cuba Victory
  • SS De Pauw Victory
  • SS Drury Victory
  • SS Duke Victory
  • SS Durango Victory
  • SS Earlham Victory
  • SS East Point Victory
  • SS Elko Victory
  • SS Elmira Victory
  • SS Enid Victory
  • SS Escanaba Victory
  • SS Ethiopia Victory
  • SS Frontenac Victory
  • SS Furman Victory
  • SS Gainsville Victory
  • SS Great Falls Victory
  • SS Greece Victory
  • SS Greeley Victory
  • SS Green Bay Victory
  • SS Gretna Victory
  • SS Grinnell Victory
  • SS Halalua Victory
  • SS Hamilton Victory
  • SS Hannibal Victory
  • SS Harvard Victory
  • SS Hattiesburg Victory
  • SS Hibbing Victory
  • SS High Point Victory
  • SS Hobart Victory
  • SS Hope Victory
  • SS Hunter Victory
  • SS Iran Victory
  • SS Jefferson City Victory
  • SS Jericho Victory
  • SS Joliet Victory
  • SS Joplin Victory
  • SS Kelso Victory
  • SS Kenyon Victory
  • SS Knox Victory
  • SS Lafayette Victory
  • SS Lahaina Victory
  • SS Lakeland Victory
  • SS Lakewood Victory
  • SS Lane Victory
  • SS Laredo Victory
  • SS Lawrence Victory
  • SS Linfield Victory
  • SS Loma Victory
  • SS Longview Victory
  • SS Loyola Victory
  • SS Luxembourg Victory
  • SS Lynn Victory
  • SS Macalester Victory
  • SS Malden Victory
  • SS Manderson Victory
  • SS Mankato Victory
  • SS Marquette Victory
  • SS Marshfield Victory
  • SS Massillon Victory
  • SS Mayfield Victory
  • SS Meredith Victory
  • SS Meridian Victory
  • SS Minot Victory
  • SS Monroe Victory
  • SS Morgantown Victory
  • SS Muhlenberg Victory
  • SS Nashua Victory
  • SS Navajo Victory
  • SS New Rochelle Victory
  • SS New World Victory
  • SS New Zealand Victory
  • SS Newcastle Victory
  • SS Niantic Victory
  • SS North Platte Victory
  • SS Norwalk Victory
  • SS Norwich Victory
  • SS Oberlin Victory
  • SS Ocala Victory
  • SS Occidental Victory
  • SS Ocean Victory
  • SS Oshkosh Victory
  • SS Pacific Victory
  • SS Paducah Victory
  • SS Pan American Victory
  • SS Pierre Victory
  • SS Plymouth Victory
  • SS Princeton Victory
  • SS Provo Victory
  • SS Purdue Victory
  • SS Queens Victory
  • SS Red Oak Victory
  • SS Rice Victory
  • SS Rider Victory
  • SS Rock Springs Victory
  • SS Rutgers Victory
  • SS San Mateo Victory
  • SS Santa Clara Victory
  • SS Sapulpa Victory
  • SS Sea Victory
  • SS Selma Victory
  • SS Seton Hall Victory
  • SS Sharon Victory
  • SS Simmons Victory
  • SS Sioux Falls Victory
  • SS South Bend Victory
  • SS Southwestern Victory
  • SS St. Augustine Victory
  • SS Swarthmore Victory
  • SS Towanda Victory
  • SS Trinity Victory
  • SS Tucson Victory
  • SS Tulane Victory
  • SS Tuskegee Victory
  • SS Twin Falls Victory
  • SS Union Victory
  • SS USO Victory
  • SS Valdosta Victory
  • SS Vanderbilt Victory
  • SS Virginia City Victory
  • SS Wake Forest Victory
  • SS Waltham Victory
  • SS Warwick Victory
  • SS Wellesley Victory
  • SS Wesleyan Victory
  • SS West Linn Victory
  • SS Woodstock Victory
  • SS Xavier Victory
  • SS Yugoslavia Victory
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Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) Ships in the Korean War

During the Korean War, the newly-formed MSTS also called up many other types of vessels from NDRF, in addition to the Victory ships.  These U.S. military ships were reactivated and sent into action with Merchant Marine crews.  The MSTS ships serving in the Korean War included the following: 

  • NDRF - Fleet reserve ships contaminated with asbestosUSNS Aiken Victory (TAP 188)
  • USNS Archer P. Gammon (TAK 243)
  • USNS Barrett (TAP 166)
  • USNS Cardinal O’Connell (TAKV 7)
  • USNS Dalton Victory (TAR 216)
  • USNS David C. Shanks (TAP 180)
  • USNS Fred C. Ainsworth (TAP 181)
  • USNS Frederick Funston (TAP 178)
  • USNS General A. W. Brewster (TAP 155)
  • USNS General A. W. Greeley (TAP 141)
  • USNS General B. B. Aultman (TAP 156)
  • USNS General B. M. Blatchford (TAP 153)
  • USNS General C. C. Ballou (TAP 157)
  • USNS General C. G. Morton (TAP 138)
  • USNS General C. H. Muir (TAP 142)
  • USNS General Daniel I. Sultan (TAP 120)
  • USNS General E. T. Collins (TAP 147)
  • USNS General Edwin D. Patrick (TAP 124)
  • USNS General H. B. Freeman (TAP 143)
  • USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey (TAP 121)
  • USNS General J. H. McRae (TAP 149)
  • USNS General John Pope (TAP 110)
  • USNS General Leroy Eltinge (TAP 154)
  • USNS General M. C. Meigs (TAP 116)
  • USNS General Mason M. Patrick (TAP 150)
  • USNS General M. B. Stewart (TAP 140)
  • USNS General N. M. Walker (TAP 125)
  • USNS General R. L. Howze (TAP 134)
  • USNS General S. B. Sturgis (TAP 137)
  • USNS General Simon B. Buckner (TAP 123)
  • USNS General Stuart Heintzelman (TAP 159)
  • USNS General W. C. Langfitt (TAP 151)
  • USNS General W. F. Hase (TAP 146)
  • USNS General W. H. Gordon (TAP 117)
  • USNS General W. M. Black (TAP 135)
  • USNS General W. O. Darby (TAP 127)
  • USNS General William Weigel (TAP 119)
  • USNS Hennepin (TAK 187)
  • USNS James O’Hara (TAP 179)
  • USNS Lt. George W. G. Boyce (TAK 251)
  • USNS Lt. Raymond O. Beaudoin (TAP 189)
  • USNS Marias (TAO 57)
  • USNS Marine Adder (TAP 193)
  • USNS Marine Carp (TAP 199)
  • USNS Marine Lynx (TAP 194)
  • USNS Marine Phoenix (TAP 195)
  • USNS Marine Serpent (TAP 202)
  • USNS Mission Los Angeles (TAO 117)
  • USNS Mission Purisima (TAO 118)
  • USNS Mission Santa Barbara (TAO 131)
  • USNS Mission Santa Clara (TAO 132)
  • USNS Mission Santa Ynez (TAO 134)
  • USNS Mission Solano (TAO 135)
  • USNS Mission Soledad (TAO 136)
  • USNS Nelson M Walker (TAP 125)
  • USNS Petaluma (TAOG 79)
  • USNS Piscataqua (TAOG 80)
  • USNS Private P. Martinez (TAP 187)
  • USNS Private Sadao S. Munemore (TAP 190)
  • USNS Sgt Jack J. Pendleton (TAKV 5)
  • USNS Sgt. Howard E. Woodford (TAP 191)
  • USNS Sgt. G. D. Keathley (T-APC 117)
  • USNS Sgt. Joseph E. Muller (T-APC 118)
  • USNS Sgt. Sylvester Antolak (TAP 192)
  • USNS Sgt. Truman Kimbro (TAK 254)

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Other U.S. Merchant Ships Serving in the Korean War

Many privately-owned merchant vessels with Merchant Marine crews also served in the supply effort during the Korean War.  These merchant vessels included the following:

  • Merchant ship delivers mail to combat troops in Korean WarAcorn Knot
  • Admiral Dewey
  • Afoundria
  • African Glade
  • African Grooe
  • African Moon
  • African Patriot
  • African Pilgrim
  • African Pilot
  • African Rainbow
  • African Star
  • Alaskan
  • American
  • American Attorney
  • American Eagle
  • American Press
  • American Veteran
  • Amerocean
  • Amersea
  • Amos G. Throop
  • Ampac Idaho
  • Ampac Nevada
  • Ampac Oregon
  • Anacostia
  • Angus McDonald
  • Anne Butler
  • Annie C.
  • Annioc
  • Apollo
  • Arizpa
  • Atlantic Water
  • Atlanticus
  • Audrey II
  • Augustine Daly
  • B. T. Irvine
  • Badger Mariner
  • Barbara Fritchie
  • Barbara Lykes
  • Barney Krishbaum
  • Beauregard
  • Benjamin Hawkins
  • Black Eagle
  • Blue Cross State
  • Blue Star
  • Booker T. Washington
  • Boy
  • Bright Star
  • Buckeye Mariner
  • Burco Trader
  • Cache
  • Cahaba
  • California
  • California Bear
  • Californian
  • Canada Mail
  • Caney
  • Cape Comfort
  • Cape Elizabeth
  • Cape Saunders
  • Capt. N. B. Palmer
  • Catherine Goulandris
  • Cecil N. Bean
  • Cedar Creek
  • Chain Trader
  • Charles Lykes
  • Charles M. Conrad
  • Charles McNary
  • Chepacket
  • Choctau
  • Christain
  • Christine
  • Christos M.
  • Citrus Packer
  • City of Alma
  • Clove Hitch
  • Coastal Sentry
  • Codington
  • Cohocton
  • Columbia Trader
  • Compass
  • Constitution State
  • Coral Sea
  • Cornhusker Mariner
  • Cossatot
  • Cotton Mariner
  • Cotton State
  • Cowanesque
  • David B. Johnson
  • David W. Field
  • Del Aires
  • Del Alba
  • Denise
  • Diamond Mariner
  • Digby County
  • Ditto
  • Dolly Turman
  • Dorothy Stevenson
  • Dudley Thomas
  • Edison Mariner
  • Edwin Markhan
  • Eileen
  • Elby
  • Elly
  • Empire State Mariner
  • Empire Viceroy
  • Escambia
  • Eugenie
  • Exmouth
  • Fairhope
  • Federal Voyager
  • Ferdinand Westfall
  • Flora C.
  • Frederic C. Collins
  • Frederick Brouchard
  • Frederick Collin
  • Frederick E. Williamson
  • Free State Mariner
  • Fribourg Trader
  • Gen. George Patton
  • George A. Lawson
  • George Culuaunds
  • George Eastman
  • George F. Duval
  • Golden City
  • Golden Mariner
  • Green Harbor
  • Green Star
  • Green Valley
  • Groton Trails
  • Gulf Water
  • Harold Andrews
  • Harold D. Whitehead
  • Harold L. Winslow
  • Harpoon
  • Hawaii Bear
  • Hawaiian
  • Hawkeye Mariner
  • Helen Lykes
  • Helen Stevenson
  • Hendry D. Lindsley
  • Heywood Brown
  • Holy Star
  • Honda Knot
  • Hongkong Transport
  • Hoosier Mariner
  • Hoosier State
  • Hurricane
  • Ike (former Sea Daring)
  • Irene Star
  • Isaac Van Zandt
  • Israel Putnam
  • James B. Weaver
  • James H. Couper
  • James H. Price
  • James McHenry
  • Jelandside
  • John Ball
  • John C.
  • John H. B. Lathrobe
  • John H. Marion
  • John Hanson
  • John Howland
  • John Kulkundis
  • John L. Sullivan
  • John Lyras
  • John Paul Jones
  • John T. McMillan
  • John W. McKay
  • John W. Powell
  • Jose Marti
  • Joseph Feuer
  • Joseph Lee
  • Joseph Priestly
  • Josuah Slocum
  • Jumper Hitch
  • Katharine B. Sherwood
  • Kenneth Stevenson
  • Kern
  • Keystone Mariner
  • Lafayette
  • Lake Minnewanka
  • Lake Pennask
  • Letitia Lykes
  • Lewis H. Emory Jr.
  • Liberty Bell
  • Liberty Flag
  • Lilica
  • Lipari
  • Lone Star Mariner
  • Lucille Bloomfield
  • Lumber Carrier
  • M. E. Comerford
  • Madaket
  • Marine Snapper
  • Mariner
  • Martin Behrman
  • Marven
  • Mary Adams
  • Mary J. Goulandris
  • Mascoma
  • Michael J. Goulandris
  • Michael Moran
  • Millicoma
  • Mission Buenaventura
  • Mission Capistrano
  • Mission Carmel
  • Mission De Pala
  • Mission Dolores
  • Mission Loreto
  • Mission Los Angeles
  • Mission Purisima
  • Mission San Antonio
  • Mission San Carlos
  • Mission San Diego
  • Mission San Fernando
  • Mission San Francisco
  • Mission San Gabriel
  • Mission San Jose
  • Mission San Juan
  • Mission San Luis Obispo
  • Mission San Miguel
  • Mission San Rafael
  • Mission Santa Ana
  • Mission Santa Barbara
  • Mission Santa Cruz
  • Mission Solano
  • Mission Soledad
  • Mohawk
  • Mohican
  • Mormacdale
  • Mormacelm
  • Mormacmar
  • Mormacmoon
  • Mormacpine
  • Mormacport
  • Mormacrio
  • Mormacson
  • Mormacspruce
  • Mormactide
  • Mormacwave
  • Morning Light
  • Mother M. L.
  • Mountain Mariner
  • Muir Woods
  • Nathaniel Crosley
  • Neptunes
  • Nevadan
  • Newaden
  • Nicholas C. H.
  • Nigel
  • Noon Day
  • Norcuba
  • North Heaven
  • North Light
  • North Pilot (former Westchester)
  • North Sky
  • Northport
  • Nutmeg Mariner
  • Ocean Betty
  • Ocean Lotte
  • Ocean Navigator
  • Ocean Seaman
  • Ocean Skipper
  • Ocean Star
  • Ocean Villa
  • Oceanic
  • Ocklawaha
  • Old Colony Mariner
  • Old Dominion Mariner
  • Old Dominion State
  • Olympic Pioneer
  • Omega
  • Ontonagon
  • Oregon Trader
  • Oregonian
  • P & T Explorer
  • P & T Navigator
  • P & T Pathfinder
  • Palmetto Mariner
  • Pamanset
  • Park Benjamin
  • Pecos
  • Pegor
  • Pelegia (former Sea World)
  • Pelican Mariner
  • Petaluma
  • Pine Tree Mariner
  • Pioneer Dale
  • Pioneer Valley
  • Piscataqua
  • Portland Trader
  • Prairie Mariner
  • President Harrison
  • Purple Star
  • Ragnor Naess (former Sea Pender)
  • Reef Knot
  • Rheinholt (Norwegian flag)
  • Richard H. Davis
  • Rincon
  • Robert B. Forbes
  • Robert G. Ingersoll
  • Robin Goodfellow
  • Robin Gray
  • Robin Hood
  • Robin Kirk
  • Robin Mowbray
  • Robin Trent
  • Rose Knot
  • Sailor’s Splice
  • Santa Venetia
  • Sappa Creek
  • Saugatuck
  • Saxon
  • Schuyler
  • Schuyler Otis Bland
  • Schuylkill
  • Sea Bon
  • Sea Champion
  • Sea Cliff
  • Sea Comet II
  • Sea Coral
  • Sea Coronet
  • Sea Daring
  • Sea Faith
  • Sea Fort
  • Sea Garden
  • Sea Gate
  • Sea Glamor
  • Sea Glider
  • Sea Globe
  • Sea Herald
  • Sea Leader
  • Sea Legend
  • Sea Life
  • Sea Manor
  • Sea Merchant
  • Sea Merit (former Simon Benson)
  • Sea Monitor
  • Sea Mystery
  • Sea Pender
  • Sea Ranger
  • Sea Splendor
  • Sea Star
  • Sea Wind
  • Sea World
  • Seaborne
  • Seaborne
  • Sebec
  • Shawnee Trail
  • Shinecock Bay
  • Soubarissen
  • Stock Star
  • Suamico
  • Sue Lykes
  • Sunion
  • Susquehanna
  • Sword Knot
  • Tabitha Brown
  • Taddei
  • Tainaron
  • Tallulah
  • Tamalpais
  • Tar Heel Mariner
  • Texan
  • Thunderbird
  • Timber Hitch
  • Tomahawk
  • Transamerican
  • Transatlantic
  • Transoceanic
  • Transpacific
  • Transunion
  • Trojan Trader
  • Volunteer Mariner
  • Wabash
  • Walcosta
  • Walter F. Perry
  • Warrior
  • Westchester
  • Western Ocean
  • Western Rancher
  • Western Trader
  • Westport
  • William Carruth
  • William Clagatate
  • William Coddington
  • William Eaton
  • William McLean
  • William Wilmer
  • Wolverine Mariner
  • Yankee Pioneer
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Sources:

http://www.usmm.org/

http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/116liberty_victory_ships

http://www.statesmarinelines.com/index.htm

http://www.msc.navy.mil/N00P/overview.asp?page=history

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/victory-ships-design.htm

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/sealift-korea.htm

http://fastlane.dot.gov/2012/05/memorial-day-2012.html#.ULYhLKzAeSo

http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/auxil/ap112.htm

 

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  • […] 4,104 officers and crew. The SS Lane Victory, by comparison, is 455 feet long and built to carry a Merchant Marine crew of 62, along with a smaller crew of 28 Navy Armed Guard to operate the communications […]